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Henry IV, Pt. 2: Act V, Scene 1

Henry IV, Pt. 2
Act V, Scene 1

Scene 1

Gloucestershire . Shallow’s house .

  1. Enter Shallow , Falstaff , and Bardolph , with Page .

Shallow

1 - 2
  1. By cock and pie , sir , you shall not away tonight . What ,
  2. Davy , I say !

Falstaff

3
  1. You must excuse me , Master Robert Shallow .

Shallow

4 - 6
  1. I will not excuse you , you shall not be excus’d , excuses
  2. shall not be admitted , there is no excuse shall serve , you
  3. shall not be excus’d . Why , Davy !
  1. Enter Davy .

Davy

7
  1. Here , sir .

Shallow

8 - 10
  1. Davy , Davy , Davy , Davy , let me see , Davy , let me see , Davy ,
  2. let me see . Yea , marry , William cook , bid him come hither .
  3. Sir John , you shall not be excus’d .

Davy

11 - 12
  1. Marry , sir , thus ; those precepts cannot be serv’d ; and
  2. again , sir , shall we sow the hade land with wheat ?

Shallow

13 - 14
  1. With red wheat , Davy . But for William cook are there no
  2. young pigeons ?

Davy

15 - 16
  1. Yes , sir . Here is now the smith’s note for shoeing and
  2. plough - irons .

Shallow

17
  1. Let it be cast and paid . Sir John , you shall not be excus’d .

Davy

18 - 20
  1. Now , sir , a new link to the bucket must needs be had ; and ,
  2. sir , do you mean to stop any of William’s wages , about the
  3. sack he lost at Hinckley fair ?

Shallow

21 - 23
  1. ’A shall answer it . Some pigeons , Davy , a couple of
  2. short - legg’d hens , a joint of mutton , and any pretty little
  3. tiny kickshaws , tell William cook .

Davy

24
  1. Doth the man of war stay all night , sir ?

Shallow

25 - 27
  1. Yea , Davy , I will use him well . A friend i’ th’ court is
  2. better than a penny in purse . Use his men well , Davy , for
  3. they are arrant knaves , and will backbite .

Davy

28 - 29
  1. No worse than they are backbitten , sir , for they have
  2. marvail’s foul linen .

Shallow

30
  1. Well conceited , Davy . About thy business , Davy .

Davy

31 - 32
  1. I beseech you , sir , to countenance William Visor of Woncote
  2. against Clement Perkes a’ th’ Hill .

Shallow

33 - 34
  1. There is many complaints , Davy , against that Visor . That
  2. Visor is an arrant knave , on my knowledge .

Davy

35 - 43
  1. I grant your worship that he is a knave , sir ; but yet God
  2. forbid , sir , but a knave should have some countenance at his
  3. friend’s request . An honest man , sir , is able to speak for
  4. himself , when a knave is not . I have serv’d your worship
  5. truly , sir , this eight years ; and I cannot once or twice in
  6. a quarter bear out a knave against an honest man , I have
  7. little credit with your worship . The knave is mine honest
  8. friend , sir , therefore I beseech you let him be
  9. countenanc’d .

Shallow

44 - 46
  1. Go to , I say , he shall have no wrong . Look about , Davy .
  2. Exit Davy .
  3. Where are you , Sir John ? Come , come , come , off with your
  4. boots . Give me your hand , Master Bardolph .

Bardolph

47
  1. I am glad to see your worship .

Shallow

48 - 50
  1. I thank thee with my heart , kind Master Bardolph , and
  2. welcome , my tall fellow .
  3. To the Page
  4. Come , Sir John .

Falstaff

51 - 74
  1. I’ll follow you , good Master Robert Shallow .
  2. Exit Shallow .
  3. Bardolph , look to our horses .
  4. Exeunt Bardolph and Page .
  5. If I were saw’d into quantities , I should make four dozen of
  6. such bearded hermits’ staves as Master Shallow . It is a
  7. wonderful thing to see the semblable coherence of his men’s
  8. spirits and his . They , by observing him , do bear themselves
  9. like foolish justices ; he , by conversing with them , is
  10. turn’d into a justice - like servingman . Their spirits are so
  11. married in conjunction with the participation of society
  12. that they flock together in consent , like so many wild
  13. geese . If I had a suit to Master Shallow , I would humor his
  14. men with the imputation of being near their master ; if to
  15. his men , I would curry with Master Shallow that no man could
  16. better command his servants . It is certain that either wise
  17. bearing or ignorant carriage is caught , as men take
  18. diseases , one of another ; therefore let men take heed of
  19. their company . I will devise matter enough out of this
  20. Shallow to keep Prince Harry in continual laughter the
  21. wearing out of six fashions , which is four terms , or two
  22. actions , and ’a shall laugh without intervallums . O , it is
  23. much that a lie with a slight oath and a jest with a sad
  24. brow will do with a fellow that never had the ache in his
  25. shoulders ! O , you shall see him laugh till his face be like
  26. a wet cloak ill laid up .

Shallow

75
  1. Within .
  2. Sir John !

Falstaff

76
  1. I come , Master Shallow , I come , Master Shallow .
  1. Exit .
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