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Henry IV, Pt. 2: Act IV, Scene 4

Henry IV, Pt. 2
Act IV, Scene 4

Jerusalem Chamber in Westminster .

  1. Enter the King , carried in a chair , Warwick , Thomas Duke of
  2. Clarence , Humphrey of Gloucester , and others .

King Henry the Fourth

1 - 10
  1. Now , lords , if God doth give successful end
  2. To this debate that bleedeth at our doors ,
  3. We will our youth lead on to higher fields ,
  4. And draw no swords but what are sanctified .
  5. Our navy is address’d , our power collected ,
  6. Our substitutes in absence well invested ,
  7. And every thing lies level to our wish .
  8. Only , we want a little personal strength ;
  9. And pause us till these rebels , now afoot ,
  10. Come underneath the yoke of government .

Earl of Warwick

11 - 12
  1. Both which we doubt not but your Majesty
  2. Shall soon enjoy .

King Henry the Fourth

13 - 14
  1.                   Humphrey , my son of Gloucester ,
  2. Where is the Prince your brother ?

Duke of Gloucester

15
  1. I think he’s gone to hunt , my lord , at Windsor .

King Henry the Fourth

16
  1. And how accompanied ?

Duke of Gloucester

17
  1.                      I do not know , my lord .

King Henry the Fourth

18
  1. Is not his brother Thomas of Clarence with him ?

Duke of Gloucester

19
  1. No , my good lord , he is in presence here .

Duke of Clarence

20
  1. What would my lord and father ?

King Henry the Fourth

21 - 50
  1. Nothing but well to thee , Thomas of Clarence .
  2. How chance thou art not with the Prince thy brother ?
  3. He loves thee , and thou dost neglect him , Thomas .
  4. Thou hast a better place in his affection
  5. Than all thy brothers . Cherish it , my boy ;
  6. And noble offices thou mayst effect
  7. Of mediation , after I am dead ,
  8. Between his greatness and thy other brethren .
  9. Therefore omit him not , blunt not his love ,
  10. Nor lose the good advantage of his grace
  11. By seeming cold or careless of his will ,
  12. For he is gracious if he be observ’d ,
  13. He hath a tear for pity , and a hand
  14. Open as day for meting charity ;
  15. Yet notwithstanding , being incens’d , he is flint ,
  16. As humorous as winter , and as sudden
  17. As flaws congealed in the spring of day .
  18. His temper therefore must be well observ’d .
  19. Chide him for faults , and do it reverently ,
  20. When you perceive his blood inclin’d to mirth ;
  21. But , being moody , give him time and scope ,
  22. Till that his passions , like a whale on ground ,
  23. Confound themselves with working . Learn this , Thomas ,
  24. And thou shalt prove a shelter to thy friends ,
  25. A hoop of gold to bind thy brothers in ,
  26. That the united vessel of their blood ,
  27. Mingled with venom of suggestion
  28. ( As , force perforce , the age will pour it in ),
  29. Shall never leak , though it do work as strong
  30. As aconitum or rash gunpowder .

Duke of Clarence

51
  1. I shall observe him with all care and love .

King Henry the Fourth

52
  1. Why art thou not at Windsor with him , Thomas ?

Duke of Clarence

53
  1. He is not there today , he dines in London .

King Henry the Fourth

54
  1. And how accompanied ? Canst thou tell that ?

Duke of Clarence

55
  1. With Poins , and other his continual followers .

King Henry the Fourth

56 - 68
  1. Most subject is the fattest soil to weeds ,
  2. And he , the noble image of my youth ,
  3. Is overspread with them ; therefore my grief
  4. Stretches itself beyond the hour of death .
  5. The blood weeps from my heart when I do shape ,
  6. In forms imaginary , th’ unguided days
  7. And rotten times that you shall look upon ,
  8. When I am sleeping with my ancestors .
  9. For when his headstrong riot hath no curb ,
  10. When rage and hot blood are his counsellors ,
  11. When means and lavish manners meet together ,
  12. O , with what wings shall his affections fly
  13. Towards fronting peril and oppos’d decay !

Earl of Warwick

69 - 80
  1. My gracious lord , you look beyond him quite :
  2. The Prince but studies his companions
  3. Like a strange tongue , wherein , to gain the language ,
  4. ’Tis needful that the most immodest word
  5. Be look’d upon and learnt , which once attain’d ,
  6. Your Highness knows , comes to no further use
  7. But to be known and hated . So , like gross terms ,
  8. The Prince will in the perfectness of time
  9. Cast off his followers , and their memory
  10. Shall as a pattern or a measure live ,
  11. By which his Grace must mete the lives of other ,
  12. Turning past evils to advantages .

King Henry the Fourth

81 - 83
  1. ’Tis seldom when the bee doth leave her comb
  2. In the dead carrion .
  3. Enter Westmorland .
  4.                      Who’s here ? Westmorland ?

Earl of Westmorland

84 - 93
  1. Health to my sovereign , and new happiness
  2. Added to that that I am to deliver !
  3. Prince John your son doth kiss your Grace’s hand .
  4. Mowbray , the Bishop Scroop , Hastings , and all ,
  5. Are brought to the correction of your law .
  6. There is not now a rebel’s sword unsheath’d ,
  7. But Peace puts forth her olive every where .
  8. The manner how this action hath been borne
  9. Here at more leisure may your Highness read ,
  10. With every course in his particular .

King Henry the Fourth

94 - 97
  1. O Westmorland , thou art a summer bird ,
  2. Which ever in the haunch of winter sings
  3. The lifting up of day .
  4. Enter Harcourt .
  5.                        Look here’s more news .

Harcourt

98 - 105
  1. From enemies heavens keep your Majesty ,
  2. And , when they stand against you , may they fall
  3. As those that I am come to tell you of !
  4. The Earl Northumberland and the Lord Bardolph ,
  5. With a great power of English and of Scots ,
  6. Are by the shrieve of Yorkshire overthrown .
  7. The manner and true order of the fight
  8. This packet , please it you , contains at large .

King Henry the Fourth

106 - 115
  1. And wherefore should these good news make me sick ?
  2. Will Fortune never come with both hands full ,
  3. But write her fair words still in foulest terms ?
  4. She either gives a stomach and no food
  5. Such are the poor , in health ; or else a feast
  6. And takes away the stomach such are the rich ,
  7. That have abundance and enjoy it not .
  8. I should rejoice now at this happy news ,
  9. And now my sight fails , and my brain is giddy .
  10. O me ! Come near me , now I am much ill .

Duke of Gloucester

116
  1. Comfort , your Majesty !

Duke of Clarence

117
  1.                        O my royal father !

Earl of Westmorland

118
  1. My sovereign lord , cheer up yourself , look up .

Earl of Warwick

119 - 121
  1. Be patient , Princes , you do know these fits
  2. Are with his Highness very ordinary .
  3. Stand from him , give him air , he’ll straight be well .

Duke of Clarence

122 - 125
  1. No , no , he cannot long hold out these pangs .
  2. Th’ incessant care and labor of his mind
  3. Hath wrought the mure that should confine it in
  4. So thin that life looks through and will break out .

Duke of Gloucester

126 - 129
  1. The people fear me , for they do observe
  2. Unfather’d heirs and loathly births of nature .
  3. The seasons change their manners , as the year
  4. Had found some months asleep and leapt them over .

Duke of Clarence

130 - 133
  1. The river hath thrice flowed , no ebb between ,
  2. And the old folk ( time’s doting chronicles )
  3. Say it did so a little time before
  4. That our great - grandsire , Edward , sick’d and died .

Earl of Warwick

134
  1. Speak lower , Princes , for the King recovers .

Duke of Gloucester

135
  1. This apoplexy will certain be his end .

King Henry the Fourth

136 - 137
  1. I pray you take me up , and bear me hence
  2. Into some other chamber . Softly , pray .
  1. The King is carried to one side of the stage and placed on a
  2. bed .
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