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All’s Well That Ends Well: Act V, Scene 2

All’s Well That Ends Well
Act V, Scene 2

Roussillon . Before the Count’s palace .

  1. Enter Clown Lavatch and Parolles .

Parolles

1 - 5
  1. Good Master Lavatch , give my Lord Lafew this letter . I have
  2. ere now , sir , been better known to you , when I have held
  3. familiarity with fresher clothes ; but I am now , sir , muddied
  4. in Fortune’s mood , and smell somewhat strong of her strong
  5. displeasure .

Lavatch

6 - 8
  1. Truly , Fortune’s displeasure is but sluttish if it smell so
  2. strongly as thou speak’st of . I will henceforth eat no fish
  3. of Fortune’s butt’ring . Prithee allow the wind .

Parolles

9 - 10
  1. Nay , you need not to stop your nose , sir ; I spake but by a
  2. metaphor .

Lavatch

11 - 12
  1. Indeed , sir , if your metaphor stink , I will stop my nose , or
  2. against any man’s metaphor . Prithee get thee further .

Parolles

13
  1. Pray you , sir , deliver me this paper .

Lavatch

14 - 22
  1. Foh , prithee stand away . A paper from Fortune’s close - stool
  2. to give to a nobleman ! Look here he comes himself .
  3. Enter Lafew .
  4. Here is a purr of Fortune’s , sir , or of Fortune’s cat but
  5. not a musk - cat that has fall’n into the unclean fishpond of
  6. her displeasure , and as he says , is muddied withal . Pray
  7. you , sir , use the carp as you may , for he looks like a poor ,
  8. decay’d , ingenious , foolish , rascally knave . I do pity his
  9. distress in my similes of comfort , and leave him to your
  10. lordship .
  1. Exit .

Parolles

23
  1. My lord , I am a man whom Fortune hath cruelly scratch’d .

Lafew

24 - 29
  1. And what would you have me to do ? ’Tis too late to pare her
  2. nails now . Wherein have you play’d the knave with Fortune
  3. that she should scratch you , who of herself is a good lady ,
  4. and would not have knaves thrive long under her ? There’s a
  5. cardecue for you . Let the justices make you and Fortune
  6. friends ; I am for other business .

Parolles

30
  1. I beseech your honor to hear me one single word .

Lafew

31 - 32
  1. You beg a single penny more . Come , you shall ha’t ; save your
  2. word .

Parolles

33
  1. My name , my good lord , is Parolles .

Lafew

34 - 35
  1. You beg more than word then . Cox my passion ! Give me your
  2. hand . How does your drum ?

Parolles

36
  1. O my good lord , you were the first that found me !

Lafew

37
  1. Was I , in sooth ? And I was the first that lost thee .

Parolles

38 - 39
  1. It lies in you , my lord , to bring me in some grace , for you
  2. did bring me out .

Lafew

40 - 45
  1. Out upon thee , knave ! Dost thou put upon me at once both the
  2. office of God and the devil ? One brings thee in grace , and
  3. the other brings thee out .
  4. Trumpets sound .
  5. The King’s coming , I know by his trumpets . Sirrah , inquire
  6. further after me . I had talk of you last night ; though you
  7. are a fool and a knave , you shall eat . Go to , follow .

Parolles

46
  1. I praise God for you .
  1. Exeunt .
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